Purpose: In past few months I wrote several articles regarding mounting Windows partition over Linux and vice-versa.  I thought it would be helpful to readers to see a summary of all the articles. So if you are looking how to mount windows partition or a network share on Linux or how to mount Linux partition on Windows, this article is exactly for you.

Note: All the following tutorials are explaining assuming Debian Linux (Etch or Lenny).

Section 1: Mounting Windows partition on Linux machine

Topic A: Mounting Windows network share on Linux over Network

Suppose you have two computers on your LAN (network) – One running Linux and other running Windows XP. Now if you would like to access your Windows XP partition on your Linux box over your LAN network then click here. You will require CIFS/SAMBA support in your kernel.

Topic B: Mounting LaCie Ethernet disk on Linux over Network

Suppose you a have network disk like LaCie’s Ethernet disk. You created a share called “data” on it on Windows machine. Now you are in Linux and if you would like to know how to access the “data” partition on ethernet disk over your LAN network on your Linux box then click here.

Topic C: Mounting Windows NTFS partition as read-write on Linux locally (on same computer)

Suppose you have a hard drive on your computer which contains Windows XP and Linux on two separate partitions – The classic dual boot option. Now mounting FAT partition as read-write is fairly simple and most of the programs like gnome-volume-manger would do it automatically for you. However mounting NTFS partition as read-write is not supported by default. Most of the program would mount the NTFS partition as Read-Only. If you would like to know how to mount your NTFS partition as read-write in Linux then click here.

Section 2: Mounting Linux partition on Windows machine

Topic A: Mounting Linux partition on Windows over Network

Suppose you have two computers on your LAN (network) – One running Linux and other running Windows XP. Now if you would to access your Linux partition on your Windows machine over your LAN then click here.This is exactly the opposite case of Section 1: Topic A that we just saw above.

Topic B: Mounting Linux partition as read-write on Windows locally (on same computer)

Suppose you have a hard drive on your computer which contains Windows XP and Linux on two separate partitions – The classic dual boot option. Now you would like to access your local Linux partition from your Windows XP machine so that you can easily read-write data on your Linux partition. To learn how to do that click here.

Conclusion:

With this I would like to conclude this review here. Hope that this article helped you in understanding various mounting scenarios locally and over the network with Windows and Linux Operating Systems.

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